Bill Moyers Insight

I was watching Bill Moyers Journal the other night and was intrigued by the final thought of the show. Moyers was discussing additional 200 billion dollars that the president now says he needs for Iraq. He had an interesting story to tell about this:

All of which reminds me of the famous French naturalist, Henri Fabre, who was intrigued by a species of worms, known as processional caterpillars, because they march single file in long unbroken lines. One day he came upon a line of them in the forest. He gathered them up, put them around the rim of a flower pot, and then started them walking. Round and round they went, like a tiny merry-go-round, hour after hour. They kept going for days and even though food was near at hand, they never strayed from their well-worn path. In the end, every one of them starved to death on end endless march to nowhere. See transcript of episode

On a side note, I’m not sure what the appropriate literary comparison of this is. Is it an analogy, metaphor, allegory or fable?

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Comments

1. kj

I think its a metaphor because allegories are usually longer and I think the animals have to talk or vote or get married or some crap for it to be a fable. And I think that analogy is a broader thing and the other three are specific types of analogies…..er?



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